Tubéreuse Trianon Notes

Top: rhubarb, petitgrain, coriander Middle: tuberose, lily of the valley, clove, jasmine, ylang ylang, neroli/orange blossom Base: frangipani, raspberry, coconut, Peru balsam

The inspiration behind Tubéreuse Trianon

1985: Tubéreuse Trianon burst onto the scene in the middle of the 80s’ the decade of New Romantics, decadence, and statement perfumes. Originally called Tubéreuse, it was reminiscent of the elaborate Trianon gardens of Marie Antoinette at Versailles, perfectly fitting in with 80s excesses. At the hands of Yuri Gutsatz, this was no ordinary tuberose. A touch of rhubarb in the top note and an unexpected note of raspberry brought out surprising facets of this enigmatic, nocturnal flower.

Yuri Gutsatz has a complex, Baroque style and he adds a little touch of something unexpected. You could say he creates unexpected twists that add a finishing touch. He was a true original.  

perfumer Maxence Moutte

In 2016 when Le Jardin Retrouvé was revived by Michel Gutsatz and his wife Clara Feder, curating a classic collection for the modern palate was crucial to the brand’s success. Yuri’s formulas made for a vast collection and it was difficult to choose just seven. Tubéreuse Trianon has more than earned its rightful place, becoming a consistent bestseller, year in and year out. Beloved of both customers and critics, its testimonials speak for themselves.

Tubéreuse Trianon today

Tubéreuse Trianon is a solar and luminous eau de parfum. With its notes of white flowers, raspberry and coconut this floral and fruity fragrance will make you travel to warmer climates: from a floral facet to creamy, musky and milky base notes. Due to its popularity, there is now a Tubéreuse Trianon candle and a matching 99% natural skincare duo consisting of hand & body milk and a body scrub. Customers report a new depth and longevity when this beloved floral fragrance is layered with our skincare products, not to mention that shimmer of iridescence.

Tuberose was introduced to Europe in the 16th century. It has a characteristic heady nocturnal scent that disappears when the flower is cut. By the 17th century, it had become popular in perfumery. Marie Antoinette called tuberose “Sillage de La Reine” and “Parfum de Trianon” after her beloved Trianon garden at Versailles, known for its intricate landscaped flowerbeds. The 20th century saw tuberose enjoying a renaissance and to this day it is widely used and enjoyed around the world.

 I think back to the first time I tried a sample of Tubéreuse Trianon. It was a year ago and I literally rolled my eyes back and luxuriated in the sunny glory of the scent. It was instant love. Had Chanel gone down the path of producing a tuberose perfume, this would be it.

KATE APTED FOR AUSTRALIAN PERFUME JUNKIES

Clara Feder’s inspired text on Tubéreuse Trianon: Trianon Gardens, Versailles, France circa 1689

“You are headed towards the Trianon in the Versailles garden where the King has had a profusion of flowerbeds planted. It is evening. You pass by a group of courtiers. A gaze pierces you. In its wake, the heady scent of tuberose, mingled with jasmine and ylang-ylang, and as though veiled, the unexpected trace of raspberry. Your heart just encountered love. It melts. 

Text and above image by Clara Feder. Feature image by Kaya Bagamaz for Le Jardin Retrouvé.

Tubéreuse Trianon perfectly illustrates the romantic facet of this versatile flower. In this perfume, the tuberose has joined a sunny jasmine and a seductive ylang-ylang note and together they merge into a very creamy and feminine scent. Even though it is listed as unisex, for me, Tubéreuse Trianon is certainly made to caress a woman’s skin. The fragrance is very potent and stays on my skin for hours and hours, but its velvety texture makes it very easy to wear and to love.

ADELINNE 07, FRAGRANTICA MEMBER